German Ministry of Labour and Social Affairs, the ILO invites interested Consultants

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Overview

  • Category : Baseline Consultancy
  • Posted Date : 04/20/2022
  • E-mail : addis_procurement@ilo.org
  • Source : Reporter
  • Closing Date : 04/30/2022

Description

 Forced Labour Data Ecosystem Study:

Mapping country-level data available pertaining to forced labour and human trafficking.

For national Consultants only

I.     Background

With funding from the German Ministry of Labour and Social Affairs, the ILO is implementing the “Strengthening Ethiopia’s capability to address forced and human trafficking” project in Ethiopia. One of the key objectives of the project is to support the strengthening of the legal, policy and institutional framework on forced labour and human trafficking in the country. To achieve this, regular and up-to-date and reliable gender-sensitive data and the sound analysis of it is required. Currently, it is not clear if there is any data collection on forced labour in Ethiopia, nor on the quality. Consulting Ethiopia’s Central Statistical Agency (CSA) learns that no government institution, both at national as well as regional level, is collecting any specific data on forced labour and human trafficking. To overcome this challenge, the project will develop a roadmap for data collection on forced labour and human trafficking in collaboration with key stakeholders as well as provide technical capacity building. A first step towards the drafting of a roadmap and the provision of tailored capacity building support, is the identification and collection of the available data pertaining forced labour and human trafficking.

II.     Job Description

The current terms of reference are for an External Collaborator to undertake a country-level mapping of existing data on forced labour and human trafficking in Ethiopia.

The external collaborator, therefore, will be responsible for identifying key data stakeholders and data sources that can be used to measure forced labour and human trafficking both at national level as well as at lower levels of administrative and geographical disaggregation, including data on forced labour/and human trafficking prevalence and characteristics, on intervention that aims to end forced labour and/or human trafficking, and the costing of it. This includes, assessing existing data sources on the possibility of integrating questions or modules on forced labour and human trafficking.

The mapping exercise will place also emphasis on administrative data systems, usually produced by different Ministries and local institutions.

The mapping will include background information about data production and use and dissemination (e.g. presence and role of national statistical office in producing forced labour and human trafficking data; data transparency laws; data ownership; data protection schemes, for who is the data collected and for which scope, etc.).

Recent qualitative analysis on forced labour and/or human trafficking will be also mapped as well as the intersection between migration at the one hand, and human trafficking and forced labour at the other hand, by looking at migration data and literature.

The scope of work will cover Addis Ababa, Oromia and Amhara regions. The External Collaborator will also be asked to support the organization of a workshop in Addis Ababa to validate the mapping study, in which the External Collaborator will present the study.

Throughout the study, the External Collaborator will collaborate with ILO HQ, ILO Addis-Ababa and the Ethiopian Central Statistical Agency.

2.1. Assess intersection between migration and forced labour/human trafficking.

Ethiopia faces a strong rural-urban migration, and many Ethiopians migrate irregularly in seek of better socio-economic perspectives. Labour recruiters frequently target young people from Ethiopia’s rural areas with false promises of a better life. Many of these who migrate irregularly fall in the hands of human traffickers and become victims of forced labour. Hence, there is a need to assess better the intersection between (labour) migration and forced and human trafficking. Such an assessment will guide the overall mapping exercise.

The External Collaborator will therefore identify the key aspects of the intersection between migration at the one hand, and forced labour and human trafficking at the other hand, and to report which data is used and which data gaps exist. This will be done through a review of literature on migration, forced labour and human trafficking in Ethiopia, with a focus on the availability of the data.

2.2 Inventory of key data stakeholders:

The External Collaborator will first briefly map the key stakeholders in the collection of data that can pertain forced labour and human trafficking information, both at national as well as regional level.

2.3 Inventory and assessment of statistical data – surveys:

A mapping of the existing statistical sources of data pertaining information on forced labour and/or human trafficking will be conducted, including the strengths and weaknesses of each source.

The mapping should not only look at existing statistical sources of data pertaining forced labour and human trafficking and assess if they can be used for collecting data on forced labour and human trafficking. In addition, an assessment should be conducted of sources that are not aimed at forced labour and/or human trafficking data collection, but who could potentially be used to collect forced labour and/or human trafficking data by integrating ad hoc questions or a specific module on forced labour/human trafficking.

A potential source for data on forced labour and human trafficking or that could be potentially used for collecting data on forced labour and human trafficking are surveys conducted by the Government (e.g. Labour Force Survey, Household Survey, Child Labour stand-alone survey), UN agencies, NGOs and civil society, often in the framework of specific projects, e.g. baseline surveys. These surveys can be national, regional, local, sectoral or population specific.

2.4 Inventory and assessment of administrative data

Administrative data are data collected and used for administrative purposes. This part of the consultancy work involves the collection of information relating to the presence and cases of forced labour and human trafficking through existing systems of administrative data.

The External Collaborator will therefore map and assess the availability of administrative data and other complementary data sources to track a series of complementary indicators of forced labour and human trafficking.

Specifically, the External Collaborator will be responsible for identifying administrative data sources of potential relevance for forced labour and human trafficking and for each administrative data source identified, describing, inter alia,

  1. the potential forced labour and human trafficking information (indicators) yielded by the source;
  2. data accessibility (e.g. restricted or in public domain);
  3. any procedures/requirements to access the data;
  4. data format (e.g. digital or print, binary, categorical, ordinal, numeric, binary, etc.);
  5. periodicity of data collection;
  6. coverage of data (e.g. subnational, regional or national):
  7. level of possible disaggregation (e.g. sex, area, district, sector, administrative or geographical units) and;
  8. strengths and weaknesses of each relevant administrative data source.
  9. linkage with other administrative sources through for example a common ID code or key variables (e.g. passport number, name, date of birth).

Examples of administrative data sources of potential relevance to forced labour and human trafficking include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • Health system records, which, if well set up to record the origin of accidents in which workers are involved, can play a valuable role in the identification and cross-referencing of migrants (irregular or regular), victims of forced labour and human trafficking.
  • Social welfare and support services information, including case management records within social protection systems, which may provide detailed information around specific cases, but also broader statistics gathered around relevant referrals.
  • Counter Trafficking Data Collaborative (CTDC) data, which is collected by IOM from different NGOs that support migrants, including from helplines. With regards to helpline data, it is worth looking if key information is collected, e.g. country of origin, country of birth/nationality, duration in forced labour, the means of coercion and status of involuntariness. If such information in not collected, an assessment should be made on whether this could be done.
  • Bureau of Labour and Social Affairs, public labour inspectorate reporting systems, etc., can provide information on the number and nature of reported forced labour and human trafficking cases, and the sectors where they occur.
  • Data from police, courts, prosecutor’s office and judiciary, which can provide information such as reported cases, arrets and prosecutions and compare with the data collected by UNODC on human trafficking.
  • Program/project data of NGOs and UN agencies, e.g. ActionAid, Woord & Daad, UNODC, IOM, etc., when linked to forced labour and human trafficking.

2.5 Inventory of qualitative data

To have a better insight on the characteristics of forced labour and human trafficking, the External Collaborator will map any recent (after 2017) qualitative analysis on forced labour and human trafficking. More specifically, the External Collaborator will draft a bibliography of qualitative data studies on forced labour and human trafficking. However, to limit the scope of this inventory, it is not required to extract data and/or evidence from these studies.

  • METHODOLOGY

The External Collaborator will be introduced to the Ethiopian Central Statistics Agency (CSA) by the project. In-depth initial consultation and a continuous exchange with the CSA throughout the mapping exercise is required.

In addition, the applied methodology by the External Collaboration will have to consist of:

  • Desk and literature review on migration, forced labour and human trafficking data (both statistical data as well as administrative data).
  • Key information interviews, i.e. interviews with data producers and users to gain additional insight into the availability, quality and scope of forced labour and human trafficking data in the broader data ecosystem, including non-traditional data sources.

The External Collaborator will have to include a detailed methodology in his/her inception report.

IV.     DELIVERABLES

The External Collaborator will be responsible for the following deliverables:

Deliverable-1:

  • Inception report with initial consultations at the country level, outlining the research (methodology) approach, including the identification of key institutions and respondents in terms of data and knowledge production, key research question to be addressed[1], semi-structured interviews protocol to assess the production, quality and use of existing data[2], and structure for the presentation of the study results.
  • Preliminary list of data sources that will be reviewed.

 Deliverable-2:

  • Draft study report. This draft report will include the following:
    1. Identification and assessment of sources of statistical data and administrative data.
    2. Detailed matrices describing the identified data sources in accordance with the set of criteria set out in section 2.4.
  • For each dataset, a list of variables.
    1. Identification of the strengths and weaknesses of each data source.
    2. A link to the website for every mapped data source when available or instructions on how to access them.
    3. Concluding section that looks at (a) general assessment of the availability and quality of forced labour and human trafficking data, (b) the viability of administrative data as a source of information on forced labour and human trafficking, and (c) a clear articulation of the identified data gaps and the possible way forwards to address it.
  • Bibliograph of qualitative data.
  • Support the organization of stakeholders’ workshop to validate draft study and present the study.

Deliverable-3:

  • Final report, which incorporates comments and feedback from the validation workshop.

Deliverable 1, 2, and 3 will be submitted to ILO for discussion, review and approval.

V.     Contract duration and cost

Proposed chronogram of activities

Activity Weeks
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15
Inception report X X X                        
Literature and desk review       X X                    
Key informant interviews         X X X                
Draft study report             X X X            
Validation workshop                         X    
Final report                         X X X

VI.     Payment Schedule

The total amount will be paid for the consultant upon the approval by ILO for a country-level mapping of existing data on forced labour and human trafficking in Ethiopia, and supporting and presenting on a validation workshop, and submitting the final report as per the following schedule.

  • Deliverable-1: Upon the delivery of deliverable-1 that includes submission of inception report with initial consultations at the country level, outlining the research (methodology) approach, including the identification of key institutions and respondents in terms of data and knowledge production, key research question to be addressed, semi-structured interviews protocol to assess the production, quality and use of existing data, and structure for the presentation of the study results within the first 3 weeks after signing of the agreement, the first 30% of the total amount will be paid.
  • Deliverable-2: Upon the delivery of all the list under deliverable-2 within the first 3 months after the singing of the agreement, the second 50% of the total payment will be made.
  • Deliverable-3: Upon the delivery of deliverable-3, that includes final report incorporating comments and feedback from the validation workshop within 3 weeks following the validation workshop, the remaining 20% of the total payment will be paid.

In addition, travel costs and DSA to travel to Oromia and Amhara region will be paid by the ILO.

VII.     Evaluation Criteria

Bidding documents (technical weighing 70% and financial weighing 30%) will be evaluated based on the following criteria. These are:

  1. Technical evaluation: 70%.

More specifically, the technical proposal will be evaluated as per the following weighing:

    1. The depth and quality of response to TOR (Demonstrated understanding of the country context and familiarity with forced labour and human trafficking): 25/100
    2. Technical compliance with the TOR (Clear understanding of the task and expressed methodology and creative approach to the assignment): 25/100
    3. Qualification and experience of the consultant (evidence of qualification and prior experience, evidence of experience in similar assignment and experience working with ILO or sister UN agencies): 25/100
    4. Proposed work and management plan (does the work plan include all deliverables with timeline? Are the responsibilities of key personnel participating in the assignment defined? Does the proposed work plan makes it feasible for consultant to deliver the work as per the timeline it provided? Does the proposed work plan align with the advertised TOR timeframe): 25/100.
    5. A bidder must score at least 45% out of the 70% to technically qualify and be considered for the next step.
  1. Financial Evaluation: 30%.

VIII.     Supervision

The consultant will work under direct supervision of the national coordinator of the “Strenghtening Ethiopia’s capabilities to address forced labour and human trafficking” project at  ILO Addis Ababa office.

IX.     Focal Person

National Project Coordinator (cf. supra) and Fundamentals Technical Officer at ILO Addis Ababa will be the focal persons.

X.     Qualification and Competencies

The external collaborator will need to have:

  • A post-graduate degree in economics, political and social sciences, international relations, or other relevant fields.
  • At least 8 years of experience in conducting analytical studies on forced labour, human trafficking and/or migration. Previous experience on these topics in Ethiopia is an asset.
  • Familiarity with statistical indicators on forced labour, human trafficking and/or migration and advanced understanding of survey and administrative data to create the indicators.
  • Experience in conducting mapping of country stakeholders of producers and users of data on forced labour, human trafficking and/or migration is an asset.
  • Good drafting and reporting skills.
  • Good communication skills, both orally and in writing.
  • Excellent conceptual and analytical skills.
  • Proficient in Amharic and English.

XI.     Application

Interested applicants should submit their letter of application, CV, copy of credentials, a detailed technical and financial proposal seperately and other supporting documents that show previous work experience, to addis_procurement@ilo.org

Deadline for submitting the applications: 30 April 2022

[1] For example: Is data available on the presence, nature, consequences and risk of forced labour and human trafficking? Who is responsible for data collection and processing?

[2] For example: How regularly is the collected? Who uses the data and to what end? Who owns the data and is it in the public domain? Is there observed differences on data availability and quality depending on geographic units, sectors, sex, age, etc.? Is missing data an issue? What kinds of bias might affect data availability and quality? Is data production and dissemination sustainable? Are there observed changes on how and why the data is collected over time? Etc…